Positive Psychology: A Necessary Revolution | Positive Psychology Concepts Series

Health is defined not only by the absence of disease but also by a complete state of physical, mental, and social well-being.

Photo credit: Külli Kittus

Each person would have a diversity of strengths and virtues within him or her.

Photo credit: Catalin Pop

Individuals who experience more gratitude and those who practice mindfulness meditation, either in general or during interventions, are more likely to engage in prosocial behaviours.

Photo credit: Erik Brolin

Love and sadness must coexist in order to exist.

Knowledge from positive psychology can inspire us to take actions that will allow us to grow individually and collectively.

Photo credit: Helena Lopes
  1. Chakhssi, F., Kraiss, J. T., Sommers-Spijkerman, M., & Bohlmeijer, E. T. (2018). The effect of positive psychology interventions on well-being and distress in clinical samples with psychiatric or somatic disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Psychiatry, 18(1), 211.
  2. Hendriks, T., Schotanus-Dijkstra, M., Hassankhan, A., de Jong, J., & Bohlmeijer, E. (2019). The efficacy of multi-component positive psychology interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1–34.
  3. Seligman, M. E. P., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55(1), 5–14.
  4. Preamble to the Constitution of WHO as adopted by the International Health Conference, New York, 19 June — 22 July 1946; signed on 22 July 1946 by the representatives of 61 States (Official Records of WHO, no. 2, p. 100) and entered into force on 7 April 1948. The definition has not been amended since 1948.
  5. Seligman, M. E. (2019). Positive psychology: A personal history. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 15, 1–23.
  6. Peterson, C., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2004). Character strengths and virtues: A handbook and classification. American Psychological Association; Oxford University Press.
  7. Niemiec, R. M. (2013). VIA character strengths: Research and practice (The first 10 years). In Well-being and cultures (pp. 11–29). Springer.
  8. Nansook Park , Christopher Peterson & Martin E. P. Seligman (2006) Character strengths in fifty-four nations and the fifty US states, The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1(3), 118–129.
  9. Seligman, M. (2018). PERMA and the building blocks of well-being. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 13(4), 333–335.
  10. Donald, J. N., Sahdra, B. K., Van Zanden, B., Duineveld, J. J., Atkins, P. W., Marshall, S. L., & Ciarrochi, J. (2019). Does your mindfulness benefit others? A systematic review and meta‐analysis of the link between mindfulness and prosocial behaviour. British Journal of Psychology, 110(1), 101–125.
  11. Ma, L. K., Tunney, R. J., & Ferguson, E. (2017). Does gratitude enhance prosociality?: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin, 143(6), 601–635.
  12. Lomas, T., & Ivtzan, I. (2016). Second wave positive psychology: Exploring the positive–negative dialectics of wellbeing. Journal of Happiness Studies, 17(4), 1753–1768.
  13. Masten, A. S. (2001). Ordinary magic: Resilience processes in development. American psychologist, 56(3), 227–238.

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